‘One Giant Leap’ and Apollo 11 at a half-century

20 July 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of NASA’s historic Apollo 11 lunar mission that put astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on the moon, while astronaut Michael Collins oversaw the command module in lunar orbit.

Here’s our favorite media selections commemorating the historic mission:

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The New York Times published ‘Apollo 11: As They Shot It’,  selections of the Apollo 11 Mission transcript, from pre-launch to landing and returning home.

Audio selections from Apollo 11: Lunar descent and Apollo 11 commander Neil Armstrong’s historic statement as he stepped of the lunar module

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“Rocket Fuel in Her Blood” is a look at NASA’s JoAnn Morgan, the instrumentation controller for Apollo 11. She was the only woman in the room at the time of the Saturn V launch on July 16, 1969. This NASA feature tells Morgan’s story in great detail, highlighting her inspiring 45 year career.

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NASA astronaut Buzz Aldrin sets up an experiment into solar wind. Courtesy: NASA Astronaut Neil Armstrong/Associated Press

“The greatest photos ever? Why the Moon landing shots are artistic masterpieces”

The Guardian’s Jonathan Jones published a piece highlighting the epic photographs of the Apollo 11 mission.

“How Neil Armstrong and  Buzz Aldrin Were Selected for the Apollo 11 mission” by Biography.com

“Just Leave Michael Collins Alone”

A piece by the Atlantic dives into Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins’ perspective on the mission and thoughts on the years that followed – from press coverage to public perception of each of the astronaut’s roles, from Collins and how he managed his command module solitude; Aldrin’s second place finish; and Armstrong’s small step.

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A look inside NASA’s future missions to the moon and mars (Artemis Program), plus a glimpse of what challenges lie ahead onto mars.

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Artemis will light our way to Mars. The new Artemis identity draws bold inspiration from the Apollo program and forges its own path, showing how it will pursue lunar exploration like never before and pave the way to Mars.

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